Jake Daghe

A structure to help you take over entire industries

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/163370954@N08/46339127625/ by Daniel Oberhaus

Learning is one of the overcommunicated but underleveraged tools of the common entrepreneur.

Everyone talks about methods of learning, but few people find realistic and authentic techniques that actually yield a net profit in the information and application categories.

Elon Musk has broken through that barrier with learning techniques that have proven successful not just once, but time and time again.

A good argument could be made that Musk has leveraged his learning by becoming a disruptor. He and his companies have shifted entire industries, including the transportation sector, the energy sector, and the space sector.

He recently announced at a press conference that his plans for his biotech company Neuralink are progressing quite nicely, hinting at yet another sector which his hands will likely shift in the coming years. …


If you’re a writer looking for an idea to get started, try this.

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Photo by Dstudio Bcn on Unsplash

Ideation is a crucial part of the writing process. A lot of writers enjoy the process of coming up with new ideas and flushing them out. In fact, many writers that I work with have a long, running list of ideas. They have dozens of started drafts and more starting points than they know what to do with. It’s common in our conversations for someone to mention, “Yeah, I need to go back through and clean out my drafts folder.”

If you’re an avid writer, you’ve likely got a graveyard of ideas. They aren’t all winners. Some of them you likely abandoned for a good reason. Some of them you tried writing and you realized halfway through that it wasn’t the right time to finish. …


Countering the common ways most relationships will end

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Photo by Brandon Hoogenboom on Unsplash

I remember when I was back in college and one of my best friends called me one day out of the blue. We talked for a few minutes before he casually dropped into conversation, “Oh, by the way just so you know, Sally and I broke up.”

I remember feeling shocked. They had been pretty serious. They were one of those couples who you just kind of felt were destined to end up married. They just seemed naturally complementary, like they were the two puzzle pieces of the multi-million piece puzzle that is modern-day romance that just connected and fit, weird edges and all. …


3 basic actions to help you cherish those around you

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Photo by Jonathan Borba on Unsplash

No one should ever have to get a phone call telling them that a loved one has passed away.

If you’ve been on the receiving end of one of those calls, you know the feeling of utter shock mixed with instant sadness. The feeling of the ground dissolving beneath your feet and the air in your lungs emptying without any sign of re-filling.

Those moments are almost other-worldly, and yet at the same time, they are some of the most real and relatable moments of our entire lives.

A few weeks ago now, I got a call from my mom telling me that one of my grandfathers had fallen, hit his head, and passed away. Completely unexpected. No one would have ever foreseen that that week, that day, would be his last. …


Getting clarity on what sets most people back

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Photo by Alvaro Reyes on Unsplash

Being likable isn’t rocket science but it’s also not something you just happen to stumble into on accident. We have an inner trigger that makes us want to be liked, but there is a big gap between wanting to be liked and actually being liked by everyone around us.

Why is being likable such a big deal, both for you personally and professionally? According to Science of People and John Kinnell, it’s because:

“Likability is the greatest predictor of popularity and social acceptance in a group for adults, more important than wealth, status or physical attractiveness.”

For some people, being likable seems to come naturally. Geniality and happiness just seem to ooze out of them like soap suds coming out of a wet sponge. But here’s the tough news: those people aren’t the majority. In fact, I’m willing to bet that’s not really how you and I operate in our day-to-day worlds. Sure, it would be nice to just automatically be likable, but more than likely, you and I are going to need to work at it. But here’s where we take a turn shift towards more positive news: being likable isn’t impossible. Anyone, and I do mean anyone, can increase their potential for likeability. …


The person who holds the canvas ultimately shapes the painting.

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Photo by Eddy Klaus on Unsplash

It’s common for people to want to see their name in lights. It’s no secret that everyone enjoys success. When our work gets recognized, re-shared, or highlighted, there’s something inside each of us that rises up like an Olympian standing atop the podium, donning a medal, and waving to a crowd of cheering onlookers. That feeling is intoxicating, making it simple to get swept up in the growing wave of perceived admiration and appreciation.

When this desire to be successful gets under our skin, it’s easy to become narcissistic as we narrow our vision and fixate on our own self-interests. We can start to reject the opportunities that we don’t see a personal angle within, we start to reduce the interactions that don’t give us something in return, and we start to respond to questions and especially challenging feedback with anger, frustration, and exasperation. In The Guardian, Zoe Williams asks the question “Are we living through a Narcissism Epidemic?” …


Book Review

From the book ‘I’m Still Here’ By Austin Channing Brown

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Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

I recently finished listening to Austin Channing Brown’s book I’m Still Here: Black Dignity In A World Made For Whiteness. It was a short listen, about three and a half hours; something you could pick up and knock out in a day. But don’t be fooled by the length of the book. The stories she tells, the information she presents, and the takeaways she offers can be chewed on for weeks and months.

I enjoyed this book because I believe it offered a slightly different perspective on the race conversation happening in so many corners of the United States and around the world today. It’s definitely worth picking up and digging into — whether you read it in a day or if you take your time going through the chapters. Austin writes from a faith (Christian) background, which mirrors a lot of my own faith background and I appreciated how she used that lens to frame her thoughts and influence her conclusions. However, even if you don’t come from a faith background, this book still has great value and can be a good resource for you if you’re looking to keep growing down this path. …


Learning from the woman who battled the White House, won a Pulitzer Prize, and reshaped the idea of journalism forever.

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Unknown / Anefo, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

“She will be remembered as a truly remarkable woman, who had a profound effect on the course of events, both at home and abroad.. Throughout the last half of the 20th century, she used her intelligence, her courage, and her wit to transform the landscape of American journalism.” — New York Times

There is perhaps no female who made a greater impact on entrepreneurship and business in the 20th century than that of the late Katharine Graham. She served as the head of the Washington Post from 1963–1991. …


An easy, inexpensive tactic to get out of relationship auto-pilot

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Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

We’ve all been there. Sitting next to our partner on the couch on a Tuesday night, eating takeout from the same restaurant we always order from, watching re-runs of the same sitcom we’ve watched through a handful of times.

It’s relationship auto-pilot.

Repetition isn’t inherently wrong. When it comes to our relationships, it’s only natural to crave what is comfortable. We may begin a new relationship being passionate and spontaneous, but the longer you date someone, the more you are at risk of falling into rhythms that can be mindless and uncreative.

You know you’re on relationship auto-pilot when your butt imprint stays on the couch when you get up to go to the bathroom before the next episode plays on Netflix. …


A modern-day, 61-point romance treatise that guides you through the greatest war of all: love.

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Photo by Jonathan Borba on Unsplash

Sun Tzu’s The Art of War is perhaps one of the most well-read and often quoted books available today. With more than 326,000 ratings on Goodreads, The Art of War has been deemed extremely important, so much so that Time Magazine wrote, “1500 years old, this ancient Chinese text is still utilized by both militaries and business schools around the world.”

But here’s the deal in the 21st Century. We aren’t at war. At least not from a military perspective. Comparatively, very few people today are gearing up to go to battle. …

About

Jake Daghe

Creative Engineer writing working hypotheses. Husband. Dishwasher. I write what I wish I could have read when I was younger. For more visit jakedaghe.com

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